General Questions

Ask your neighbors, friends, coworkers and family members if they can make recommendations. Investigate each of the movers you select with the Better Business Bureau. Good service is the best measure of a good mover!

The busiest times for moving companies are during the summer months, May 15 – September 15. At the end of these months, the volume of shipments is extremely heavy. This is the case for all professional moving companies. If you plan to move during this time of the year it is recommend to book the dates as early as possible. It is wise to give your moving company from four to six week’s notice, if possible. The more lead-time you can give, the more likely the moving company would be able to meet your preferred delivery schedule.

Take all the factors into consideration when deciding on the best time for you to move. If you have some flexibility in your schedule, provide the moving company with a five day window for loading your shipment. This will allow the individuals who schedule the drivers and crew members greater flexibility when scheduling your move. If possible, be flexible with your destination timeframe as well. Keep in mind that you most likely are not the only shipment on the truck. If you stay flexible, it should make a difference.

The cost is determined by factoring the weight of your household goods, the distance of the move and any additional services needed or requested.

It would be more accurate to say that a moving company is “registered.” For example, The Inland Sea has been issued a certificate of authority by the federal government to move household goods among any of the 50 states. As a motor carrier, TIS has maintained a certificate of authority with the US Department of Transportation (DOT) since September 27, 1988.

Insurance

Yes, but how much protection you have and its cost to you depend upon the valuation coverage you choose – Full-Value Coverage or Released Rate Liability (60 cents per pound per article).

The valuation option you select determines the basis upon which any claim will be adjusted and establishes the maximum liability of the moving company. The liability of the moving company for loss or damage is based upon its tariffs, as well as federal laws and regulations, and has certain limitations and exclusion. Valuation is not insurance; it is simply a tariff-based level of motor carrier liability. If you desire insurance, you should consult your insurance company representative about available insurance coverage, because The Inland Sea does not offer insurance.

With this type of valuation, the carrier’s maximum liability for loss or damage to any article in the shipment is 60 cents multiplied by the weight of the article. This is the basic liability level and is provided at no charge.

Under this protection plan, if any article is lost, destroyed or damaged while under the carrier’s authority, it will either 1) repair the article to the extent necessary to restore it to the same condition as when it was received by the carrier, or pay you for the cost of such repairs; or 2) replace the article with an article of like kind and quality, or pay you for the cost of such a replacement. An additional charge applies for this option. The carrier will determine the appropriate settlement method to be used.

Full-Value Coverage and deductible options are available in dollar increments to fit your needs at very attractive rates.

The deductible options are as follows:

Option A — Full-value protection with no deductible
Option B — Full-value protection with a $250 deductible
Option C — Full-value protection with a $500 deductible

The carrier’s total liability for loss or damage will be the amount you declare as the value of your shipment. However, the minimum total declared value must be at least equal to the weight of your shipment multiplied by $5.00.

In the moving industry, items having a value of more than $100 per pound are known as “articles of extraordinary value.” All “articles of extraordinary value” in your shipment must be listed on the High-Value Inventory form which will be given to you by the salesperson to complete. Although you might have other articles of extraordinary value, the following list should help you identify items that might fall under this classification: jewelry, furs, art and coin collections, crystal, figurines, antiques, Oriental rugs, precious stones or gems, china and silverware. In the event of a claim, any settlement involving an article of extraordinary value listed on the High-Value Inventory form is limited to the value of the article, not to exceed the declared value of the shipment, based upon the carrier’s valuation program applicable to your shipment. If an article of extraordinary value is not listed on the form, the carrier’s maximum liability is limited to $100 per pound per article. If you are not shipping any items of high value, sign the form and print the word “None” in the inventory list.

Shipments that move under the Released Rate Liability program, in which the declared value of the shipment would be 60 cents per pound per article, would not be covered by the provisions applicable to articles of extraordinary value. The High-Value form should still be signed with the words “Not Applicable” written on the form.

Special Items

Items of extraordinary value such as jewelry, money, antiques and stamp collections can be included in your shipment, provided that you notify your local moving representative of these items before packing and moving day. It is strongly recommended that you carry irreplaceable and expensive articles with you or make other arrangements for their transport.

In the moving industry, items worth more than $100 per pound are considered to be articles of “extraordinary” value. To be assured that a claim involving these articles is not limited to minimal liability, complete and sign your mover’s version of a high value inventory form. Also be sure to sign the “Extraordinary (Unusual) Value Article Declaration” box on the Bill of Lading.
Each mover has a slightly different procedure to follow as it relates to high value items. Ask your relocation consultant to provide you with an explanation of their process. This is a confusing but important task, so make sure that you clearly understand the rules prior to load day.

Frozen foods can be moved, but only under specific, limited conditions. Be sure to discuss this with your moving consultant. In most instances, we suggest that shipping arrangements be made through local frozen food locker plants, especially for a long-distance move. It is even easier just to use up the foods prior to the move or donate them to someone.

We cannot accept responsibility for safely moving your plants, because they may suffer from a lack of water and light as well as probable temperature changes while in the van. You may prefer to transport your house plants in the family car or ship them by plane.

Some states prohibit the entry of all plants, while other states will admit plants under certain conditions; still others have no plant regulations. Be sure to check the regulations of the state to which you’re moving.

It is against the law to transport combustible or flammable materials. Please safely dispose of all combustible materials including but not limited to, cleaning solvents, corrosives, fireworks or flares, gasoline, kerosene, motor fuel, lamp oil, oil-based paints, thinners and varnishes, lighter fluid, fire extinguishers, nail polish remover, bleach, , aerosol cans, propane containers and cylinders, matches and old batteries.

Explanation of Terms

A binding estimate is a contract that specifies, in advance, the precise cost of the move based on the services requested or deemed necessary at the time of the estimate. If additional services are requested or required at either origin or destination, the total cost will increase.

A non-binding estimate charges you according to the actual weight of your shipment and the actual cost of the services that are performed. You will still go though the estimating process to determine what your shipment may cost.

To verify the weight of your shipment, the driver will weigh his trailer prior to loading your shipment. Once your shipment is on board, the driver will weigh his trailer again. All other charges will be calculated at your origin address. If there are any additional charges that are incurred during the delivery process, the driver will provide you with the additional cost. This is a rare event, but it may occur.

Every mover is required to prepare a bill of lading for every shipment transported. The bill of lading is the receipt for your goods and the contract with your mover for their transportation. The driver who loads your shipment must give you a copy of the bill of lading.

It is your responsibility to read and understand the information on the bill of lading before you sign it. The bill of lading identifies the mover and specifies when the transportation is to be performed. It also specifies the terms and conditions for payment of the total charges and the maximum amount required to be paid at the time of delivery if you are moving under a non-binding estimate. Information regarding the valuation of your shipment and the amount the mover will be liable for in the event of loss or damage is also shown.

The driver will usually inventory your shipment as he or she loads it (but it’s not required by law). When completed, the inventory provides a detailed, descriptive listing of your household goods and the condition of each item when received by the mover.

Be sure that everything listed on the inventory is correct. This is not always the easiest task, as you will find things written on the inventory like PBO, which means Packed by Owner. The contents of this carton can’t and won’t be listed because the driver is not able to see inside each and every box. You will also find CP on a line item in the inventory. This means Carrier Packed container. These are two important listings.

You will also notice that in the middle column on the inventory form a line that has many letters and numbers associated with a specific item but it may make no sense to you. This is where the driver uses inventory code to make note of the condition of that particular piece. To understand this code, look at the top of the inventory sheet for the legend that explains what that code means. SC – scratched, C – chipped, 3 – right side if piece and 8 for the top of the piece. This is a simplified way for the driver to make note of any irregularity or existing damage.

Remember, this inventory is for you to keep track of what is loaded and the condition of each item. If damage occurs on a particular piece during the loading process, get the inventory tag number on that item and make a note in the far right hand column on the line that corresponds with that piece. This is the document that will be scrutinized when the claims process is initiated so it is important to have the damage clearly noted.

This inventory should also be used at destination when your shipment is delivered. Use the inventory to verify the articles that are delivered and again note an exception to the condition of the items as they are brought into your home. Point out the damage to the driver.

What often occurs is that a piece of furniture has been in your home for many years and you grow accustomed to looking at it in a certain place and in a certain light. When you bring that same piece into your new home, you may notice damage that may have been there for a long time. The driver will have noted the scratch or chip at your origin residence. If you are not sure if it was existing damage or new damage, ask your driver to explain the condition of the piece as he noted on the inventory during the loading process. This is the quickest way to clear up what is new damage and what was there all along.
Our drivers are very careful about the way they handle your items and the inventory is their safeguard against felonious damage claims. Use this inventory as a positive tool to make sure that you are protected just as the driver will use it to protect him or her.

This is the list of rules, regulations, available services and resulting charges used by all motor carriers which provide interstate transportation of household goods. The tariffs are published by each household goods motor carrier and include its various services. The tariffs are available for your inspection upon request.